About Us

The UK has one of the highest estimated rates of FASD in the world, but these conditions are commonly misunderstood and under-diagnosed, with very few specialists in England. FASD is difficult to diagnose because most individuals with FASD do not show physical anomalies. However, high rates of prenatal alcohol use across the country indicate that the prevalence of FASD, and thereby the risks associated with it, are likely to be significantly higher than currently reported. At University of Salford, we are working closely with clinicians, researchers and the community to determine accurate information on the prevalence of FASD as well the effects of FASD on child development in terms of learning, cognition, behaviour and physical anomalies. We are also working with policy makers to facilitate fast traction of the information to clinicians around the country for better diagnosis and early intervention and also raise awareness amongst affected individuals and families so that they find it easier to seek diagnosis and the support they may need.

We are part of the UK FASD Research Collaboration. This network was formed to foster increased collaboration and sharing of information between groups researching into the areas of prenatal alcohol exposure and the long-term consequences of FASD, as well as to lobby for increased provision of research funding in this area. The current committee members include:

  • Alan Price, Research Fellow at University of Salford
  • Jen Shields, Clinical Psychologist at NHS Ayrshire & Arran
  • Neil Aiton, Consultant Neonatologist at Brighton and Sussex University NHS Trust
  • Penny Cook, Professor of Public Health at University of Salford
  • Raja Mukherjee, Clinician and Honorary Reader at University of Salford
  • Sarah Brown, Consultant Paediatrician at NHS Ayrshire & Arran

Meet the team

Prof Penny Cook

Professor of Public Health

Dr Raja Mukherjee

Honorary Reader

Dr Clare Allely

Reader in Forensic Psychology

Dr Alan Price

Research Fellow

David Junior Gilbert

PhD Researcher

Robyn McCarthy

Research Assistant

Nicola Hickman

Researcher

Afia Masood

Communications Lead