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About Me

Photo by Ruth Hage

I’m a final year PhD student and Graduate Teaching Assistant in the School of Environment and Life Sciences at the University of Salford. While I was studying for my undergraduate degree in Animal Behaviour and Welfare I developed an interest in the behaviour of zoo animals. I’m particularly interested in the effects of captivity on zoo mammals and I believe that through research we can understand how to provide the best environment for captive animals. Zoos play an important role in the conservation of biodiversity and we have a duty to ensure that all the physical, environmental and behavioural needs of captive animals are met.

The rapid decline in the wild cheetah population has led to the development of co-ordinated captive breeding programmes in zoos and breeding facilities in order to try and boost cheetah numbers, however many zoos have encountered problems in breeding cheetahs. My PhD project aims to enhance our understanding of the behaviour of cheetahs in captivity, which is crucial if zoos are to provide the optimal captive conditions for breeding.

As a Graduate Teaching Assistant, I help to deliver lectures, tutorials, workshops and laboratory sessions to undergraduates. This blog records my research and teaching experiences throughout my PhD study.

 

Publications

Chadwick, C. L., Rees, P. A. & Stevens-Wood, B. (2013) Captive male cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus soemmeringii) form naturalistic coalitions: measuring associations and modelling chance encounters. Zoo Biology 32(5), 518-527. doi:10.1002/zoo.21085.

Tetley, C. L. & O’Hara, S. J. (2013) Preliminary observations of the effects of social group housing on the behaviour of captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). In: Proceedings of the Salford Postgraduate Annual Research Conference (SPARC) 2012. Salford: University of Salford. p90- 101. Available here.

Tetley, C. L. & O’Hara, S. J. (2012) Ratings of animal personality as a tool for improving the breeding, management and welfare of zoo mammals. Animal Welfare 21(4), 463-476. doi:10.7120/09627286.21.4.463.